You are viewing synaesthesis

Fri, Sep. 20th, 2013, 04:32 am
voyantd: Hello

I just came across this community. I have no diagnosis and don't seek one. But I wanted to share what has always led to my own personal interest in the subject.

To me the lower-case 'f' when written in a typical way makes me sit there and think, "what a pompous ass that 'f' is", every time. When I write it I have to make it either angular so it resembles an upper-case 'F' (to which I have no reaction) or I have to give it a tail. Otherwise I can't really look at it. For whatever reason, as well, it is only when it is hand-written.

I've never told very many people this, but I thought if I was going to share it anywhere, this may be a good place.

Fri, Aug. 10th, 2012, 05:53 pm
cali777: syneshesia-grapheme personality traits?

Hello,

I would love to hear from all fellow-syneshesia-grapheme friends out there who wouldn't mind describing your personality.  Do you consider your self an introvert or extrovert? Do loud people bug you?  For those of you who lived away at college for the first time, was it a real shock - cause too much sensory input all of the time (i.e. dorm living?).  The reason I am asking is that I am getting ready to go away to college for the first time and I'm a introvert with syneshesia-grapheme.  I consider myself a home-body, I get "over-loaded" pretty easily, but I do have friends!  I am looking forward to college.  Just thinking about the whole personality connection with my color/letter/number thing ...... thanks !!

Sat, Jul. 28th, 2012, 06:23 am
cwbeas: New here. Sound, colors, and Spatial Reasoning

Hello, my name is Chase, age 24, and I am here to get input from others that might perceive the world as I do.  Please reply with anything you feel is relevant. 

I grew up around photographers, musicians, and artists. I was born cross-eyed, so my brain only uses one eye for general sight and the other for just periphery vision on that side.  ( i had corrective surgery at age 6) From my earliest memories I always had art books and music around me. Hell, my dad gave me a Salvador Dali book when I was 5. I new for along time I was different than others, but my dad's circle of friends kept me feeling normal for awhile. 

It was not until my second year of architecture college that I realized I was not just different, but exceedingly so. My professor asked us to go out and capture images of "the surreal". It took my weeks to realize that being able to innately see the surreal was not something everyone can do. For example, i almost always find myself witnessing the "in-between" states of things. The caustics of an environment (an allusion to light and optics), incidental shapes, sounds, and reflections are paramount in my perception of that which is around me. 

Also, as a musician, I have had ample opportunity to discuss sounds v color with other musicians. I have discovered that interpreting sounds as color is rare. I thought everyone saw colors and shapes when listening to music.  

My sound-->color synethesia is wholly un-solicited on my behalf. Almost all the sounds I hear i get instant feedback in colors and shapes. Even the sound of my keyboard clunking now is liken to a grey flag in the wind.  

However, I found very little information or personal stores that share the same kinds of perception i have.

(For complete lack of found evidence or nomenclature..i have myself given this a name) I would say I have some sort of Spatial Synethesia. Spaces, 3d shapes, motion, and similar, produce vibrant overlays of color and sound. It is as if the world is animated in a flurry of its own reflections. I have zero trouble using this in an operant manner. That is, I am able to bend, warp, and shape these synethic perceptions at will.  

I have just recently put together a portfolio of selected photographs and still artworks. It has taken me at least 10yrs of effort to build a craft or process that illustrates my perception. On my website, there are several images that should stand out apart from the rest that are fairly "straight". 

celluloidsigil.weebly.com

So, if anyone has any thoughts or suggestions as to what this "spatial link" is, please comment or contact me. I have watched every documentary I can find and just about every online article. But not one has suggested that the 2D process of synethesia (stimulus=resultant) can be solicited in a 3rd dimension of usability (stimulus+resultant=X). 

Thank you,
-C

PS, I also should mention that I suffer from chronic migraines and insomnia. (might the mild seizures of migraines be related to synethesia???)

Fri, Apr. 13th, 2012, 11:53 am
sneakishfrog: (no subject)

I figured out recently that in my time-space synaesthesia, I am always oriented within October. For example, if I hear that someone's birthday is in June, it takes me a minute to think "is that in the near future or recently past?" and then I find myself placed in October, and have to move the "time strip" backwards-and-to-the-right in order to figure out what month it is currently. (Complicated!) This usually means that my "October orientation" is situated in the past October, not any specific year and not usually in the future. (I don't find myself sliding the time strip forward-and-to-the-left which would tell me that I was looking into the past from my October orientation.) haha, very complicated to explain synaesthesia in words! And it still doesn't capture it.

Does anyone else with time/space synaesthesia find that "now" is a somewhat stagnant orientation like that? I can't think of a logical reason for October, either. (Not that "A" should logically be red or "N" blue, but there they are.)

Wed, Jan. 4th, 2012, 10:56 pm
ergotismus: (no subject)

"Got Synesthesia?: Hong Kong Artist Lio Yeung Lets Viewers See Like a Butterfly, or a Baby, in New Show

Do you ever wonder whether the red you see is the same as another person sees it, or if there is any literal truth in the adage about beauty being in the eye of the beholder? It was questions like these that inspired artist and designer Lio Yeung’s exhibition, “A Is Green, R Is Red,” now showing at agnès b.’s LIBRAIRIE GALERIE in Hong Kong.

Yeung's show is all about playing with the different ways you can see the world and was originally inspired by the phenomenon of synesthesia, the condition whereby some people can perceive one kind of stimulus (say, sound) as another (say, color). For most people reading this story, the background to these words would look white and the letters would all look black (or perhaps a bit gray,) but for people with synesthesia the letters of the alphabet would each have their own separate color. Intrigued by this discovery, Yeong went on to explore all the other differences that exist in the way different people — and animals — see the world.

Particularly influenced by scientific research into visual disorders, and by artists whose work he came to know during his recent travels in Europe, Yeung’s “A Is Green R Is Red” project is full of exaggeration and unexpected juxtapositions. Highlights include “Magritte,” a neon installation interpreting how babies begin to see objects by tracking their motion, and a photographic collage inspired by the work of the inventor of the electronic flash, Harold Edgerton. In this latter piece every image is overlapped, one over another, like a flip book that doesn’t quite work properly. Most stunning of all, however, is an ultraviolet light drawing in the exhibition called "Blossom," which shows how a flower looks through the eyes of a butterfly."

(Pictures from the show are in the slide show) http://artinfo.com/news/story/754708/got-synesthesia-hong-kong-artist-lio-yeung-lets-viewers-see-like-a-butterfly-or-a-baby-in-new-show

Fri, Sep. 23rd, 2011, 09:25 am
jennekirby: Anyone with grapheme/color and color/taste synaesthesia?

You might enjoy the video under this cut, showing how one person made it so he can literally taste words in a cocktail.Collapse )

There's a fascinating (to me, anyway) description of how he made this contraption on a post over at his website, morskoiboy.com.

(Description of video/image: a cocktail drink mixer made to look like a typewriter, where pressing a key allows colored and flavored syrups to mix with the alcohol, which causes a display to show the letter in the color of the syrup for that letter and then that flavored syrup to be deposited into the drink with the alcohol.)

Wed, Jun. 29th, 2011, 04:59 pm
matt1993: Light indigo, slightly-yellow orange, sea green, sea green, somewhat more yellow orange (i.e. hello)

Hi all! I'm new here. My synesthesia types, for anyone curious:

- Grapheme→color synesthesia

- What I'm currently calling "song→color synesthesia". (elaboration)Collapse )

- Grapheme→personality synesthesia with highly varied degrees of vividness. (elaboration)Collapse )

- VERY limited music→taste synesthesia. (elaboration)Collapse )

A few questions:

My grapheme→color synesthesia seemingly inspired by letter magnets, etc., yet with the colors ending up almost completely different?Collapse )

Grapheme→color synesthesia, but not a savant? (this is a lot of LJ-cuts!)Collapse )

3) Is it common to have synesthesia with varying degrees of vividness, such as the grapheme→personality synesthesia I describe above?

Answers would be appreciated, and since I'm infamous for not making sense, I apologize if this doesn't make sense either.

Thu, Mar. 24th, 2011, 04:02 pm
aurora_nebulosa: Christians with Synesthesia

How are Christians to understand their synesthesia in the context of their Christianity? Is there any biblical example of people (not necessarily with synesthesia) but with other unusual perceptions (un-related to spiritual ones? If so, were these approved of, disapproved of, or reacted to indifferently either th bye writer of a given book or by the "characters" within it? Should Christians understand their perceptual situation as a "disability" or as a "blessing"?

Fri, Mar. 11th, 2011, 09:07 pm
stephbeeston: Film project on synaesthesia

 Hi everyone,

I'm a London-based student  currently starting a film project on synaesthesia, focusing on ways to convey multisensory experiences purely through visual techniques.

I need a few subjects that have synaesthesia to talk about their experience with it and how it affects them on a daily basis. Initially it would only need to be via email or phone, but ultimately I'd be wanting to film or record audio interviews.

If anyone is interested in this project or would just like to know a bit more about it, please let me know and email me at steph.beeston@gmail.com

Thanks a lot!

Fri, Mar. 11th, 2011, 11:28 am
starladear6: Anti Spam! Enabled captchas to post!

Hey all,

aki_no_kaze kindly told me how to turn on the anti-spam feature that requires all posters to solve a captcha before posting. Thanks Aki!

Sorry for the tiny inconvenience to the community, but I know how much you all hate spam, so I felt this would be a small price to pay for a little peace and quiet. :)

Please send all your flowers of gratitude to aki_no_kaze. :) I just pushed the buttons.

Edit: Actually, apparently aki told me how to do this SEVEN WEEKS AGO according to the timestamp on the email. I only now saw it because I got a new spam notification and dealt with it, then noticed an unread email that explained this.

I'm terribly sorry for not turning this feature on immediately. I'll try to be a better moderator from now on. :)

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